5 Ways to Observe Mental Health Awareness Month -
Advocacy,  Mental Health Education,  Mental Health Law,  Mental Health Resources for Families

5 Ways to Observe Mental Health Awareness Month

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May is National Mental Health Awareness Month!

Every year during this month organizations, bloggers, individuals and non-profits raise their voices to fight the stigma behind mental health issues.

What does that mean for us here at MSB?

  1. During May, we’re focusing on current and past mental health legislation and laws affecting you as a patient
  2. We’ll be participating in various activities, events, and hashtags occurring in May (like NAMI’s #NotAlone campaign)
  3. We’ll be using Mental Health America’s Mental Health Month Tool Kit to highlight the need for Preventative Mental Health Care for All. It’s a great resource, especially for us bloggers, so I’ve included the whole kit below if you’re interested!

4. We’ll be fundraising for NAMI, MHA, and DBSA three organizations that have made a huge impact on the mental health community

5. Most importantly, we’ll be highlighting Mental Health Stories more than ever to increase visibility for our community

What Can You Do During Mental Health Awareness Month?

The answer is lots!

Whether you’re struggling with a mental health issue, a support person, or just an interested member of the public, there’s always something you can do to help raise awareness!

Here’s a quick list with so much more to come in the days ahead πŸ™‚

  1. Get screened – It’s just as important to check up on your mental health status as it is to get a checkup on your physical health. This year Mental Health America is urging people to join their #MillioninMay campaign. It’s a push for at least a million Americans to be screened for disorders such as depression, anxiety, PTSD and many more. You can do so by going to https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools
  2. Tell your story on social media – Visibility can be scary. I get it. It was really hard for me at first to put my struggles out on social media. But, being transparent with my own struggles has helped so many people. Sharing your story on social media helps people understand that it’s okay to talk about mental health issues.
  3. Ask questions about mental health legislation– There’s a lot of legislation out there that concerns you as a mental health patient. It’s really important to have an awareness about where your local and state representatives stand on MH issues. It’s also helpful to have a working knowledge of laws affecting the mental health system in your area. If you want to know more: follow our Mental Health Law and Legislation Topic.
  4. Talk to your friends and family about suicide – Keeping the topic of suicide shrouded in mystery and shame only leads to more deaths. This May, do your best to create a safe space for friends and family to talk openly about mental health challenges. Find out how you can do to start the conversation here: https://mysoulbalm.blog/2020/04/09/what-to-do-if-your-friend-is-contemplating-suicide/
  5. Join online campaigns and eventsOrganizations like NAMI and MHA are providing online awareness campaigns that are so easy to join. Seriously, you can raise awareness just by using hashtags, sharing graphics like the one below, watching free webinars, and joining in on Zoom Town Halls.

Wrap Up

So there you have it! That’s just 5 of the myriad of ways to help our Mental Health Community raise awareness this month.

If you’re in recovery like I am remember this: be brave, be visible, and be proud not just for you but for others as well. People will benefit so much from seeing your story of success. If you’re currently in the struggle, just know you’ll get there too and that we’re all here for you during May and far beyond <3

Much Love,

MB

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Mad as Hell Mental Health Rights Advocate. Likes margaritas, long walks on the beach, and JUSTICE.

2 Comments

  • supal

    I can’t agree more with #2! I shared my story and was transparent about having severe stress and anxiety and it helped so many others.

    • mmorran1

      It’s true so many people stay quiet about their experiences for fear of being judged, but it really is helpful for everyone to be open! I’m glad you shared your story πŸ’–

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